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I'm reading a short story "Getting rid of Geogre" by Robert Arthur. In story, there's a conversation that I can't understand (the bold part). The context is: Laura Layne is the famous star of Hollywood. And Dave is the head of publicity which Laura is working for. He said to her that there's a new reporter wanted to make a quick interview with her. And she said:

"I'll give him Three-B. Now send up Harry Lawrence with a drink, and then I'll be down."

What does "Three-B" mean? I've searched on Google but it seems that none is useful. Thank you in advance. Since I can't find a text on internet, so I post a picture of book content. enter image description here

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    In context, I think she means that she's answered these same press questions so many times that she'll give him the same stock answers she always gives. In this case, she's going to give him answer "3B" as opposed to 2A or 1C
    – Valorum
    Jun 23, 2023 at 18:46
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    Speculative: Laura later says "I told Dave I'd see you downstairs". The only words the narrative has her saying to Dave about the journalist are "I'll give him Three-B". Could it be a reference to giving him a particular seat for the show?
    – tgdavies
    Jun 25, 2023 at 9:15

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I've seen some references to "bravado, bluster and bullshit" as the three Bs of celebrity, and it would fit well for brushing off someone in an interview.

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    This might be correct, but would be improved by some links or sources.
    – Rand al'Thor
    Jun 20, 2023 at 18:25
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    There are lots of sayings like this, such as "Beauty, Brilliance, and Brains". The trick will be finding evidence for which one Arthur had in mind. Jun 20, 2023 at 20:12
  • Thank you all. It's clear as sky now.
    – Sour Tofu
    Jul 8, 2023 at 13:26

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