24

The first nine albums were originally published in black and white, with colored editions to appear later:

  • Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (never redrawn in colour )
  • Tintin in the Congo
  • Tintin in America
  • Cigars of the Pharaoh
  • The Blue Lotus
  • The Broken Ear
  • The Black Island
  • King Ottokar's Sceptre
  • The Crab with the Golden Claws

Which books have been entirely redrawn? I can confirm that Tintin in the Congo, Tintin in America, Cigars of the Pharaoh and The Blue Lotus were, but I have no first-hand experience with the latter titles.
I assume that the books published only in color haven't been significantly modified.

Opening frames 1931 (monochrome) and 1946 (colour)

The opening frames from the 1931 and 1946 versions of Tintin in the Congo (source)

5
  • Thanks for the advice in posting remarks in the correct place. I initially began to write it as a comment, but the advice about comments said not to include answers there, so I was unsure of the best place to post. If you prefer I can edit my answer to explain the info found in the link. I will do this as soon as I can.
    – user1964
    Oct 4 '17 at 11:49
  • @Puzzlepumpkin: Were your comments deleted? I don't remember these "remarks". If you can answer, be sure to do so.
    – user598527
    Oct 4 '17 at 11:55
  • The website link is comicsbin.blogspot.co.uk/2011/04/….
    – user1964
    Oct 4 '17 at 15:24
  • The website link found in my comment above may help you to a partial answer, and contains links to further specialist sites. The author of this site states that there were changes made to The Crab With Golden Claws, although it doesn't sound as if it was completely redrawn. The changes include altering characters from negroes to whites or Arabs, at the request of the American publisher and removing the names of the cafés.
    – user1964
    Oct 4 '17 at 15:59
  • You might be able to find the answer on Tintinologist.org.
    – Literalman
    Oct 9 '18 at 15:03
4

Below is a list of the 24 official Tintin albums with notes on revisions they underwent, where applicable:

  1. Tintin au pays des Soviets / Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (1930): this album was never redrawn by Hergé and not published in colour during his lifetime. In fact, the album was long out of print before its reprint in 1981 (see Casterman's description, in French). (Michel Bareau and Nadège Rombaux created a colour version published by Casterman in 2017.)
  2. Tintin au Congo / Tintin in the Congo (1931): originally published in black-and-white and entirely redrawn by Hergé and Edgar P. Jacobs for the colour version (Assouline, page 323), which was published in 1946.
  3. Tintin en Amérique / Tintin in America (1932): originally published in black-and-white and entirely redrawn by Hergé for the colour version (Assouline, page 323), which was published in 1946.
  4. Les Cigares du pharaon / Cigars of the Pharaoh (1934): originally published in black-and-white and entirely redrawn by Hergé and Edgar P. Jacobs for the colour version (Assouline, page 323), which was published in 1955.
  5. Le Lotus bleu / The Blue Lotus (1936): originally published in black-and-white, this album was not redrawn by Hergé, except for a few minor alterations; Edgar P. Jacobs contributed to the colouring (Assouline, page 323); the colour version was published in 1946. (Some fans consider the colour version as a "redrawn album"; see Quels sont les albums de tintin qui ont été redessinés ?.)
  6. L'Oreille cassée / The Broken Ear (1937): originally published in black-and-white, this album was not redrawn by Hergé, except for a few minor alterations; the colour version was published in 1943, i.e. before Hergé's collaboration with Edgar P. Jacobs, which began in January 1944 (Assouline, page 323).
  7. L'Île Noire / The Black Island (1938): originally published in black-and-white, with a colour version following in 1943, Hergé redrew this album on request of his British publisher Methuen, who had reported that the album contained 131 errors and imprecisions. For this project, Hergé sent his assistant Bob de Moor on a trip to London, Ardrossan, Glasgow and Edinburgh (Assouline, pages 608–612). The revised version was published in 1965, making this album the only one that appeared in three versions. (The three versions were also published together by Casterman in 2005: Tintin - Dossier -71- L'île noire, which can no longer by found on Casterman's website. Some comparisons can be found in the forum discussion Tintin originaux ou redessinés ?.)
  8. Le Sceptre d'Ottokar / King Ottokar's Sceptre (1939): originally published in black-and-white, this album was redrawn by Hergé and Edgar P. Jacobs for the colour version (see Assouline, page 323, who mentions the "balkanisation of the backgrounds and costumes"), which was published in 1947.
  9. Le Crabe aux pinces d'or / The Crab with the Golden Claws (1941): originally published in black-and-white, followed by a colour version in January 1944. The French version of this album was not redrawn, but American publisher Simon & Schuster wanted Hergé to remove all black people (who were not supposed to exist in the USA at the time), all images that display the consumption of alcohol (this album introduced the alcoholic Captain Haddock and 27% of the images make at least some reference to alcohol) and modifications of the strong language (another characteristic of Captain Haddock) (Assouline, pages 473–476).
  10. L'Étoile mystérieuse / The Shooting Star (1942): from title onwards, all albums were published in colour versions. Hergé did not redraw this album except for replacing the Blumenstein to Bohlwinkel and replacing the American flag of the antagonists with a fictional flag.
  11. Le Secret de La Licorne / The Secret of the Unicorn (1943).
  12. Le Trésor de Rackham le Rouge / Red Rackham's Treasure (1944).
  13. Les Sept Boules de cristal / The Seven Crystal Balls (1948).
  14. Le Temple du Soleil / Prisoners of the Sun (1949).
  15. Tintin au pays de l'or noir / Land of Black Gold (1950). British publisher Methuen suggested alterations for the British market. Hergé replaced the conflict between Jewish terrorists and British soldiers in Palestine with a conflict between the partisans of sheikh Bab el Ehr and the army of emir Ben Kalish Ezab, removed the character Goldstein (Assouline, pages 615–617). Certain pages are partially or entirely redrawn. The revised version was published in 1971.
  16. Objectif Lune / Destination Moon (1953).
  17. On a marché sur la Lune / Explorers on the Moon (1954).
  18. L'Affaire Tournesol / The Calculus Affair (1956).
  19. Coke en stock / The Red Sea Sharks (1958): originally published in colour and slightly revised in the second half of the 1960s (after the revision of The Black Island) to remove anything that might cause accusations of racism (Assouline, pages 612–614). Hergé also made a minor correction after someone pointed out that the staircase before the entrance of Moulinsart / Marlinspike Hall had only 8 steps instead of the usual 9 (Assouline, 566).
  20. Tintin au Tibet / Tintin in Tibet (1960).
  21. Les Bijoux de la Castafiore / The Castafiore Emerald (1963).
  22. Vol 714 pour Sydney / Flight 714 to Sydney (1968).
  23. Tintin et les Picaros / Tintin and the Picaros (1976).
  24. Tintin et l'Alph-Art / Tintin and Alph-Art (1986): unfinished and published posthumously, hence never redrawn after publication.

Summary: Only 5 albums were redrawn by Hergé (and assistants): Tintin au Congo, Tintin en Amérique, Les Cigares du pharaon, L'Île Noire, Le Sceptre d'Ottokar, with several others (comparatively) undergoing minor revisions.


References:

  • Assouline, Pierre: Hergé. Édition revue et corrigée par l'auteur. Gallimard, 1996.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.