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Did Realism stand in opposition to Romanticism, and on which particular aspects?

Definition of Realism from https://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Realism:

realism, in literature, an approach that attempts to describe life without idealization or romantic subjectivity. Although realism is not limited to any one century or group of writers, it is most often associated with the literary movement in 19th-century France, specifically with the French novelists Flaubert and Balzac. George Eliot introduced realism into England, and William Dean Howells introduced it into the United States. Realism has been chiefly concerned with the commonplaces of everyday life among the middle and lower classes, where character is a product of social factors and environment is the integral element in the dramatic complications (see naturalism). In the drama, realism is most closely associated with Ibsen's social plays. Later writers felt that realism laid too much emphasis on external reality. Many, notably Henry James, turned to a psychological realism that closely examined the complex workings of the mind (see stream of consciousness).

The preface of Pierre et Jean by Maupassant, standing as a manifesto of Realism, is not very virulent against Romanticism.

Chapter 17 of Adam Bede by George Eliot criticizes some aspects of Romanticism (without mentioning it by name); but overall, the critics seems to me not very virulent either.

The popular writer Alain de Botton brought some criticism over Romantism, but from the "Classicism" point of view, not from the Realism point of view (although we can find some of the same arguments and examples of Chapter 17 of Adam Bede).

Some words from Balzac (Introduction of The Human Comedy), about the moral philosophy of the Romantic Rousseau:

Man is neither good nor bad, he is born with instincts and aptitudes; Society, far from depraving him, as Rousseau claimed, perfects him, makes him better; but interest also develops his evil inclinations. Christianity, and especially Catholicism, being, as I said in the Country Doctor, a complete system of repression of man's depraved tendencies, is the greatest element of Social Order.

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