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The Stung Man is the antagonist of Book of the Dead, the first TombQuest book. He's got an... Interesting backstory.

The Stung Man wasn't called the Stung Man at that point, not yet. Everyone gets their nickname for a reason.
As the pharaoh's men searched outside, the thief discovered that his hiding place was full of scorpions.
Alex tried to imagine it. Was there light in the cave, or was it the sound that first alerted him to the fact that something was wrong? By then it didn't matter, because they were on him. The thief was stung again and again, all over his body: his legs, his torso, his arms, his neck. His face.
He refused to call out.
He chose death over capture.
When they finally found him, he was swollen past recognition. His stubborn courage earned the pharaoh's grudging respect. The Stung Man was given a lavish burial and a story that would last thousands of years.
TombQuest: Book of the Dead, chapter 4

I know some Egyptian mythology and stories, but I've never heard of a story like this. Then again, I'm hardly an expert.

Is there any Egyptian story like this? Did Michael Northrop base his story off of anything?

  • Does "The Stung Man" really sound like an Egyptian myth? (or any kind of myth at all)? – user111 Apr 23 '17 at 18:55
  • I wasn't sure on the terminology. – user58 Apr 23 '17 at 19:15
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It came from personal experience

While he didn't die, he once got repeatedly stung by a bunch of yellowjackets.

The TombQuest Wiki says this about the matter:

The Stung Man's story was inspired by a real event of Michael Northrop. He, his brother, and his brother's friend were hiking up a mountain, and one of them accidentally steps on a yellow jacket nest, and they start running. Michael remembered he got over 75 stings, his brother got only 2, and his brother's friend got none.

(A yellow jacket is a type of wasp).

On his online biography he says this:

Three random facts about me:
1) I am dyslexic and had to repeat second grade.
2) I once stepped on a yellowjacket nest and was stung approximately 75 times.
3) According to family lore, I am related to Jonathan Swift, who wrote Gulliver’s Travels.

So thats definitely true.

It appears that he decided to incorporate his own experience into the books. When he writes

The thief was stung again and again, all over his body: his legs, his torso, his arms, his neck. His face.

And

When they finally found him, he was swollen past recognition.

That was probably what happened to him.

  • While it's interesting, I don't see that the wiki quotes a source for that assertion (maybe I just missed it). The biography does help a little bit, though. @Mithrandir. – Shokhet Apr 23 '17 at 18:40
  • Let us continue this discussion in chat. – user58 Apr 23 '17 at 19:35

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