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from Pastel by Pavlo Tychyna:

II
The iron day
Drank up some good wine
Blossom, meadows! -
:I've been walking-for a day-
Graze, herds!-
:to see my love- for a day-
Ears of grain like cradles sway!-
:during the day.
The iron day
Drank up some good wine

Why the colons in front of some lines? What does this mean?

5
  • Ru translation: stihi.ru/2017/06/01/9582
    – Andra
    Sep 10, 2022 at 18:35
  • for me it seems like there are three exclamations, each followed by a part of the narration forming together "I've been walking-for a day - to see my love-for a day - today"
    – Andra
    Sep 10, 2022 at 18:41
  • original text: ukrlib.com.ua/books/printit.php?tid=5533. The word after the last colon is "удень" = by day, in the daytime.
    – Andra
    Sep 10, 2022 at 18:47
  • It seems a thing in Slavic poetry; Gennadiy Aygi (who wrote in Russian and the Turkic language Chuvash) also did a lot of play with colons, although not the same kind of stuff. Very avant-garde.
    – Stuart F
    Sep 26, 2022 at 20:12
  • Are you suggesting "II" is a colon, or did I miss something? Oct 7, 2022 at 22:27

1 Answer 1

1

Just try to see these sentences if they are written as a story and not a poem:

II
The iron day. Drank up some good wine
Blossom, meadows! - :I've been walking for a day-
Graze, herds!- :to see my love- for a day-
Ears of grain like cradles sway!- :during the day.
The iron day. Drank up some good wine

The sentences after the colon are actually relating to the previous sentences, and hence not starting with the colon.

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