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The following is my signature line in terms of stressed and unstressed syllables:

u= unstressed, s= stressed. All I know is the 'music'. I don't know the forms and the lingo associated. This is my signature line:

s u / u s / s u s / s u s / s u u / s u s / u s u / s u.

Something like that. The last two groupings fade or melt away. Is there a name for all this? What exactly is going on?

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  • There's no obvious metrical pattern here, so it's not a meter that has a name; it's free verse.
    – Peter Shor
    Aug 4 at 20:17
  • 1
    This question would be easier to follow if you included your signature line. Aug 5 at 8:18
  • I’m voting to close this question because it has nothing to do with literature.
    – Chenmunka
    2 days ago
  • 2
    What do you mean by the term ‘signature line’?
    – Spagirl
    2 days ago

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I'm going to take a wild guess that this describes your delivery more closely than your composition. Especially because you wrote it in eight "feet," the universal melodic phrase of song. If you could write your words on sheet music, you might see the musical structure more clearly.

That said, regrouping it as follows shows two main patterns, each in four feet, linked by one extra slack in the middle:

/-- //- //- //- (-) /- /- /- /-

My guess is you slow down in the second half, which accounts for the fade you mentioned. Try reversing a foot instead for syncopation.

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