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Let us take the book series TombQuest, by Michael Northrop. This book series is published by Scholastic, and they have a website for it. This series is a multiplatform, which means that there is a game associated with it. Like (which is also a multiplatform). In that game, the connection is obvious - you hunt for the clues. And in another multiplatform, Infinity Ring, the connection is even more obvious - the game is part of the story, and each book picks up where the game left off, and vice versa.

I'm having trouble finding a connection between the book TombQuest and its video game counterpart. In the book, the main characters have to Fight a group called the 'Death Walkers'. And in the game, you have to build your tomb, and invade other players tombs, avoiding their traps, and try to steal their treasure.

I don't see how they are connected. Then again, I've only read the first book (and I haven't played in a looong time. I was, however, one of the fifty beta testers for the game). Is there any connection?

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    I'm confused, @Hamlet. If spoiler tags "don't go in the question body," where should they go? ...I haven't read the books (and don't plan to), so I can't judge this case, but if Mith thinks that this is something that readers won't want to see in advance of reading it in the books, why shouldn't this information be protected by spoiler tags?
    – Shokhet
    Mar 28, 2017 at 15:59
  • @Shokhet literature.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/34/… The question is about the book/game, the title gives the names of the books and the games, it should be obvious that the question will contain spoilers for said books and games.
    – user111
    Mar 28, 2017 at 17:20
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    @Hamlet I haven't really been involved in that discussion, but I don't see that the top-voted answer says "no spoiler tags at all." Catija said "no spoilers in titles," and "don't overuse spoiler tags." ...I think there is still room for some use of spoiler tags in posts (if I'm skimming questions about a series that I'm in the middle of, for example), and that it is possible to use them without overusing them. Perhaps something for meta...
    – Shokhet
    Mar 29, 2017 at 3:16

1 Answer 1

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I asked Michael Northrop, the author, for an answer, and he sent me a Direct Message on Twitter with the answer. I'll post what he wrote in quote blocks, and support it with quotes and screenshots.

Good question! In TombQuest, Alex and Ren often find themselves trying to navigate dangerous, trap-filled underground tombs—just like players in the game do. The game also includes weapons, costumes, tomb designs, and even villains, like the Stung Man, from the different books in the series.

For example, Book 2: Amulet Keepers is set in London. When it was released, items from that location (like the Royal Guard costumes) were added to the game. Now that all of the books are out, all the special items are available. (The code inside each book unlocks them.)

So basically, the connection between the books and the game is in what you’re doing (exploring tombs that often resemble ones from the series) and in what you’re doing it with. I like to use Tut’s Kopesh (from Book 3) as my weapon, and I usually choose Alex’s scarab amulet over Ren’s Ibis for extra protection. When I’m designing a tomb, I usually pick creepy old Highgate Cemetery (from Book 2) as the theme. I live in New York, though, so sometimes I go with the old subway tunnels from Book 1.

—Michael Northrop, author of TombQuest

Let's go through this, and look at some quotes and screenshots.


  • In TombQuest, Alex and Ren often find themselves trying to navigate dangerous, trap-filled underground tombs—


    "Got you!" Alex crowed.
    Ren's nerves were a jumbled mess, but she pushed Alex away, got to her feet, and tried to get it together. "Oh, great," she managed. "Traps."
    Book of the Dead, chapter 21


    just like players in the game do.

    picture of the game, from the main page of the TQ website


  • The game also includes weapons, costumes, tomb designs, and even villains, like the Stung Man, from the different books in the series.

    For example, Book 2: Amulet Keepers is set in London. When it was released, items from that location (like the Royal Guard costumes) were added to the game. Now that all of the books are out, all the special items are available. (The code inside each book unlocks them.)


    "You see?" said the Stung Man. "They're just here to do a job. I'm the one you have to worry about."
    Book of the Dead, chapter 22


    And last, but certainly not least, is the new tomb theme. I don’t want to give too much away, but let’s just say that perhaps the archaeologists missed a spot when they set out to uncover all the tombs in the Valley of Kings. This one comes with some wear and tear; fire damage, I fear. Handle with caution!
    TombQuest development blog


Tl;dr: We see that in the game, you have to act sort of like they do in the books, and you also have cool items and stuff from the books in the game.

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