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Magda Szabó, according to many, many sites, wrote

a tribute to her husband, Tibor Szobotka, a writer and translator of Tolkien and Galsworthy who died in 1982.

Unfortunately, searching for variations of Magda Szabó Tibor Szobotka tribute either runs into more repetitions of the same idea, or the Google Doodle tribute. Everyone seems to agree that this tribute to her husband exists, I just can't locate it. So, where can I find it? I'd prefer an English version, but that's not a hard requirement. (The tag is a guess here, since I suspect she would have written the tribute in Hungarian but can't find it to confirm!)

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  • Do you mean the book 'Megmaradt Szobotkának'? I do not think it has a digital version or an English translation.
    – Aolon
    Aug 18 at 5:27
  • @Aolon Searching on that title certainly brings up E-book versions. This site seems to claim to have free download available, but I have no idea if it really does or if it is legal...hu-pdf.web.app
    – Spagirl
    Aug 18 at 10:40
  • @Spagirl I stand corrected. I doubt it is legal but it is there.
    – Aolon
    Oct 10 at 6:45
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The article on Szabó Magda on Hungarian Wikipedia says that Szabó Magda wrote the book titled Megmaradt Szobotkának as a tribute to her husband Szobotka Tibor. The article on the husband says that this book is the biography of the husband, based on sections written by Szobotka Tibor as well as his diaries, completed to full form by Szabó Magda. The book was first published in 1983, soon after her husband's death. There is a freely readable (with no easy download) electronic copy of the book available on the internet. This is made available courtesy of Digitális Irodalmi Akadémia, of which Szabó Magda was a founding member. Dead-tree copies are also available from libraries in Hungary. I do not know if there are any translations available.

In addition to the above, the article on Szabó Magda says that she handled her husband's estate, which means she probably had a hand in editing or publishing some of Szobotka Tibor's posthumous volumes. The article on Szobotka Tibor lists 5 or 6 such volumes.

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