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(If this question does not fit this site, let me know and I'll delete it).

I'm considering buying the "Annotated Edition" of Ulysses published by Alma Classics. I was wondering about the nature of these annotations, specifically for Chapter 14, "Oxen of the Sun".

This chapter is well known to be almost impenetrable, and I would like to know whether the annotations attempt to help read and understand the sentences in it, and how/why they mean what they are usually assumed to mean in summaries of Ulysses (as opposed to, say, just elucidate the allusions in the chapter). This is related to a previous question I posted.

I enjoyed very much deciphering the sentences in this chapter which I managed to decipher, and I'd be very happy for help with the rest.

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    Whether the annotations "help at all" will be dependent on how much you understand by yourself, how much background knowledge you have, how much time you devote to trying to figure out how it all works, etc. - I'm not sure this is answerable.
    – bobble
    Jul 27, 2021 at 16:13
  • The annotations are visible via the "Look Inside" feature on Amazon — I suggest you take a look and see. But the Kindle edition is only £4.99 so if it were me I would just take a punt. Jul 27, 2021 at 16:18
  • @bobble By "help at all" I meant to ask whether there's such an attempt (most editions I looked at didn't). GarethRees: Thanks, but I don't have an e-reader...
    – Ell
    Jul 27, 2021 at 16:21
  • @Ell Lack of an e-reader shouldn't stop you from reading the annotations via Amazon's web site! Jul 27, 2021 at 16:24
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    @Spagirl: You need to use the "search for a word or phrase" feature (the magnifying glass in the top left) to see pages after the initial sample. Here's a copy of page 726 which has notes for the "Oxen of the Sun" chapter as requested by the OP. Jul 28, 2021 at 13:38

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