1

What does 'pinoc' in The Man in the High Castle mean? I had the feeling it is someone subordinate but I did not find an exact explanation in the book.

  • 2
    Could you give some context? A quote from the book? – Chenmunka Mar 3 '17 at 11:16
  • Sorry @Chenmunka, I couldn't quote the book as I didn't have it in english. Turns out, had I read it in english, there wouldn't have been any question... – ylka Nov 27 '17 at 10:06
10

It is an epithet for the puppet government of the Pacific States of America:

Since he had never been able to make out Wyndam-Matson's relationship to the pinocs — the puppet white government at Sacramento — he could not fathom his ex-employer's power to sway the real authorities, the Japanese.

Although I do not think this is ever explicitly mentioned in the book, I believe the word derives from the name of the fictional puppet Pinocchio.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you! I looked it up why I was so confused and turns out in the translation I was reading it said: "..Wyndam-Matson's relationship to the pinocs AND the puppet white government at Sacramento.." Now it makes much more sense ;) – ylka Nov 27 '17 at 9:56
  • 1
    I agree with the other answer, and believe “pinoc” is a reference to the typically longer noses of caucasians compared to east asians. – Joe Sep 8 '18 at 4:07
1

It means an underling or non-Japanese. As it says on page 7 of my copy:

he could not fathom his ex-employer's power to sway the real authorities, the Japanese. The LJC was pinoc run.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.