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Many years ago I read a rather interesting book that tracked the life of two physical objects (a whip and a crown perhaps) over several centuries. The book was given to me as a child by my father, who read it as a child. Napoleon's invasion of Russia plays a role in the book with two characters surviving a winter using the remains of a horse for shelter. I am now trying to find the name of the book and if it is still in print.

I probably read the book back in the 1970s. My father probably read the book in 1920s/1930s. Does that help? Predictably, I read the book in English. Was it originally written in English? I really don't know. I remember it as a reasonably large book, but I am not sure.

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  • Repost of this?
    – bobble
    Jun 5, 2021 at 17:51
  • Bobble, Yes definitely a repost. My hope is that this is the right place to post my question. Of course, it might not be. Where should this question be posted? Jun 5, 2021 at 18:44
  • The question is on-topic here. Whether you get an answer is a different problem - someone may be able to find the book, someone may not. See the identification-request wiki for more information that could help narrow down the book. (e.g. we don't know when you or your father were children, so saying that doesn't help us)
    – bobble
    Jun 5, 2021 at 19:02
  • If it weren't for your father's having read the book in the 1920s or 1930s, I would say this sounds like the style of a James Michener novel. He loved to track things and families over centuries in his longer works.
    – shoover
    Jun 6, 2021 at 0:09
  • shoover, So true. When I was younger, I read Tai-Pan and Shōgun both by Clavell. Of course, I read numerous works by Michner as well. These books (along with "The Emerging Japanese Superstate" by Herman Kahn) greatly influenced my view of Asia and Asians. After 50 years, what I learned from these books still stands out. Jun 6, 2021 at 1:53

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