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Here is the poem "Philosophy" by Nissim Ezekiel. What do the parts in bold mean?

There is a place to which I often go,
Not by planning to, but by a flow
Away from all existence, to a cold
Lucidity, whose will is uncontrolled.
Here, the mills of God are never slow.

The landscape in its geologic prime
Dissolves to show its quintessential slime.
A million stars are blotted out. I think
Of each historic passion as a blink
That happened to the sad eye of Time.

But residues of meaning still remain,
As darkest myths meander through the pain
Towards a final formula of light.

I, too, reject that clarity of sight:
What cannot be explained, do not explain.

The mundane language of the senses sings
Its own interpretations. Common things
Become, by virtue of their commonness,
An argument against the nakedness
That dies of cold to find the truth it brings.

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  • It means pretty much anything you want it to. That's the beauty of art. Jun 3 at 9:38
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    For "mills of God", see Wikipedia Jun 3 at 12:25
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The whole poem undoubtedly has several layers of meaning.

Let me give one possibility for the meaning of the third stanza.

In the first two stanzas, the poet seems to be contemplating the entire history of the universe from some timeless viewpoint.

But residues of meaning still remain,
As darkest myths meander through the pain
Towards a final formula of light.

This reminds me a lot of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s quote:

The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.

The next lines:

I, too, reject that clarity of sight:
What cannot be explained, do not explain.

reject this view, and say that you shouldn't be looking for morality in the history of the universe.

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