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This is a passage in a book called Missing Out by Adam Phillips:

But the outrageous, pragmatic strong reader in this account reads as if he knows what he wants, and not as though he is conflicted about what he wants, or indeed is in flight from it (he might, of course, discover it through the reading). The strong reader’s belief in his reading is such that he does not need to persuade or convert anyone else. But by negating the contribution of others, the strong reader misses out on being told what his strong reading might be, in the best and the worst sense, an attempt to get out of. Rorty’s questions might be rephrased as: What is the text good for getting me out of? What can I use it to get out of?

What that "in flight from it" mean? Does it mean "away from it"?

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TL;DR: in this context, "in flight" means "running away".

Nowadays, in the modern world, the most commonly seen meaning of "in flight", often hyphenated as an adjective "in-flight", is referring to activities carried out during aeroplane travel (or even as a more abstract adjective in reference to that, see this English SE question).

In the passage you quote, though, "flight" is used in a slightly more old-fashioned meaning, seen as the fourth meaning here:

flight noun (ESCAPE)

(an act or example of) escape, running away, or avoiding something:

  • They lost all their possessions during their flight from the invading army.

So let's look at the passage in your question:

[the reader] reads as if he knows what he wants, and not as though he is conflicted about what he wants, or indeed is in flight from it

The unidentified reader here, referred to as "he", is described in relation to the equally unidentified "what he wants", which is then referred to as "it". He knows it (what he wants): he is not conflicted about it, and he is not in flight from it. The meaning of the latter is a slightly metaphorical "flight": not literally running away, but perhaps trying to escape the idea of what he wants, as for example somebody who doesn't want to address or face up to his desires.

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    It may help to note that this meaning of flight is more closely connected with flee than the other meanings (which are more closely related to fly).
    – gidds
    Feb 13 at 23:26

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