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I may have read this in an Alfred Hitchcock anthology somewhere in the mid 1990s. An up and coming starlet is about to head off on her honeymoon with her new beau when her ex-husband and former agent shows up, threatening to blackmail her for her more adult entertainment history if she doesn't pay him off, I think with an implication that he still considers himself to have marriage rights with her. His identifying trait is a lazy wink that I remember her referring to as making her feel sleazy. A scuffle ensues, perhaps involving the new husband, and the ex is killed, which leaves her in the awkward position that being found with a dead body will sink her career, so they decide to stash the body in the trunk of the car, hoping to dispose of it during their honeymoon. Unfortunately, they're stopped, I think by the police, and forced to open the trunk, revealing the body, whereupon the body performs the same lazy wink despite being dead.

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I found it. "Getting Rid of George" by Robert Arthur. The plot summary from the TV adaptation, "Good-Bye, George"

Academy Award hopeful Lana Layne's past comes back to haunt her on the eve of her marriage. She was once known as Rosemary "Peaches" Cassidy and was married to an ex-convict named George. George thought she was dead, but has tracked her down. He wants to stay her husband and tells her that if they divorce, he will get half of everything she owns. Lana does want him as her husband but also does not want a divorce. She hits him on the head and kills him. Lana and her fiance Harry Lawrence decide to bury George's body during their honeymoon. They also try to keep the location of their honeymoon a secret. Unfortunately, a gossip columnist tracks them down to get an exclusive story about their honeymoon. She surprises them just as they unpack George's corpse.

I found a copy of Alfred Hitchcock presents My Favorites in Suspense on the Internet Archive and confirmed it's a very similar story to the above, and what I remember. It's a bit more lurid, with her having formerly been part of a burlesque act with her husband. It's a "long, slow, obscenely knowing wink" that he does when revealing his identity, and at the end, rigor mortis causes his eye to open and close in "a lewd and knowing wink".

What got me there was a search for "alfred hitchcock" starlet ex-husband wink.

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