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This text is from The Children's Bach by Helen Garner.

He would have liked to move around her house and examine all its icons, or to hang over the front windowsill with her and make remarks about the dress and gait of passing pedestrians; but he wanted also to get her outside and on to his own turf, into public places where no-one was host and no-one guest, where everything had a price, where he could get what he wanted, pay for it, and keep moving in long, effortless, curving afternoons unsnagged by obligation or haste: the idea of destination meant almost as little to him as it did to Billy.

‘I’m supposed to be on my way to work,’ he said.

‘I thought you only worked at night.’

‘Something came up.’

‘Are you worried about getting there on time?’

‘No. I’m just worried about being comfortable.’

‘Did you say “comfortable”?’ said Athena.

‘Yes, I did. But I didn’t mean it.’

That was his way of talking. When she pressed him he was not there. Like most women she possessed, for good or ill, a limitless faculty for adjustment. She felt him give; she let herself melt, drift, take the measure of his new position, and harden again into an appropriate configuration. There was something to be got here, if only she could . . .

As a non-native English speaker, I want to know am I getting well the meaning of this part, because I am not sure.

Does "When she pressed him he was not there" mean: when she asked him some question he did not like it his answer was unclear or in a way to escape the question?

Does "she possessed a limitless faculty for adjustment" mean: For being as Knowledgeable as he, she urged herself to learn everything?

And does "She felt him give; she let herself melt, drift, take the measure of his new position, and harden again into an appropriate configuration. There was something to be got here" mean: she felt him generous; she wanted to know carefully about his new position (his new attitude) and then became less strict and less sympathetic to him. There was something mysterious she had to know it?

she felt him give is really unclear to me.

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To press someone is to try hard to get a response from them. See sense 6b of the verb press in Merriam-Webster:

to insist on or request urgently.

When Athena tries to get an answer from the man, he avoids a straightforward response. All his statements disagree with anything she says, even if they contradict what he himself has said previously. He says works only at night, but then has to go in to work during the day; she asks if he's worried about being on time, he says he isn't; he says he wants to be "comfortable," then says he didn't mean that. So you are right: she presses him, i.e., tries hard to pin down his position, but his responses are "a way to escape the question."

She possessed ... a limitless faculty for adjustment means that she had the power to change herself to accommodate whatever his statements and wishes were. No matter what stance he adopted, she could adjust herself to that. Her ability to adjust to his whims is endless.

The next sentence elaborates on her power ("faculty") of adjustment. She felt him give means she noticed a change in his position. See definition 2 in Merriam-Webster:

2a : to yield to physical force or strain
  b : to collapse from the application of force or pressure
   // The canvas chair gave under her weight.
  c : to undergo or submit to change
   // for the strike to be settled, something has to give

So when she presses him, i.e., puts pressure on him for an answer, he gives, i.e., he shifts his position. She feels this shift and, using her limitless faculty for adjustment, herself accepts this new position, and hardens herself into it.

There was something to be got here, if only she could is a comment on Athena's wishful thinking. The man is being evasive, but she seems certain that she can actually get him to commit to something if only she keeps adjusting to whatever new position he adopts. She feels that if she keeps on pressing him, and keeps on adjusting to whatever he says, then eventually she will be able to find out what their real situation is. But he himself wants to be unsnagged by obligation, i.e., he does not want to commit to anything. He wants to keep everything transactional, where everything had a price, where he could get what he wanted, pay for it, and keep moving. So the entire passage is about how he is trying to evade being pinned down to a relationship, and Athena is convinced that if only she keeps accepting everything he does and says, eventually she'll find some solid ground in that relationship.

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