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The quote "Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it" is found in the final passage of Norman Maclean's autobiographical novella A River Runs Through It:

Like many fly fishermen in western Montana where the summer days are almost Arctic in length, I often do not start fishing until the cool of the evening. Then in the Arctic half-light of the canyon, all existence fades to a being with my soul and memories and the sounds of the Big Blackfoot River and a four-count rhythm and the hope that a fish will rise.

Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it. The river was cut by the world's great flood and runs over rocks from the basement of time. On some of those rocks are timeless raindrops. Under the rocks are the words, and some of the words are theirs.

I am haunted by waters.

What does he mean by "Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it."?

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The sentence you are asking about starts with “Eventually,” which indicates that it is a continuation of the action in the previous sentence. So we have:

in the Arctic half-light of the canyon, all existence fades to a being with my soul and memories and the sounds of the Big Blackfoot River […] Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it.

There is a double meaning here. First, as the twilight deepens, everything in the canyon disappears into the gloom (“all existence fades”) until the only things that the fisherman can sense are himself and the river (which he can hear). Eventually, “all things merge into one [thing]” (that is, into darkness), and a river runs through the darkness.

Second, the fisherman becomes so deeply absorbed in his activity that he loses all awareness of anything other than himself and the river. This deep absorption is indicated by the odd expression “a being with my soul and memories” instead of “myself” (indicating a kind of dissociation or out-of-body experience) and by the phrase “all things merge into one” (indicating that in his mind, there is no distinction between himself and the canyon and the activity of fishing). Hence when “the river runs through it” it runs (metaphorically) though the fisherman as well as (literally) through the canyon.

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