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In Ishay Ribo's song "Keter Melucha / כתר מלוכה" (Royal Crown), a song written about, essentially, COVID and lockdown, there's a stanza that goes like this:

בין תצווה לכי תישא
אסתר פורים משתה שמחה
מי יחנה ומי יסע
ומי ישא בתוצאה

Between Tetzaveh and Ki Tisa
Ester, Purim, feasting, joy
Who will stay and who will travel
And who will bear the consequences
(my own translation)

What does the line "ומי ישא בתוצאה" ("and who will bear the consequences") mean here? The consequences of gathering for Purim? A play on words with the previous line ("travel" and "bear" being pronounced the same way)? What?

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This is both wordplay on the word "yisa" (travel / bear) and a reference to the people becoming sick as a result of ignoring COVID-19 restrictions.

מי יחנה ומי יסע
Who will stay and who will travel

As we should know by now, traveling and meeting with people is heavily discouraged in the middle of a pandemic; meeting with people can get them sick, as even if you're not symptomatic you can still be an asymptomatic carrier. This line refers to who will make the responsible decision to stay home and who will ignore the restrictions and travel.

This is especially significant when we take the previous line in this stanza into consideration:

אסתר פורים משתה שמחה
Ester, Purim, feasting, joy

The song is referring to the time of the holiday of Purim, when traditionally people will travel to all their friends' houses and deliver gifts (called Mishloach Manot), and give donations to the poor (Matanot L'Evyonim). In addition, there's a religious requirement to hear the scroll of Esther read - which usually means going to a synagogue full of people, which, again, isn't the best idea during a pandemic. So: Who will follow the restrictions, or who will ignore them for the sake of the traditional celebration of the holiday?

ומי ישא בתוצאה
And who will bear the consequences

When people ignore the pandemic precautions, there are going to be consequences - people getting ill, and possibly even dying. The song asks, who's going to suffer because of the people who ignored the COVID guidelines? So often it's not going to be the people who broke the restrictions, but the elderly and ill who get exposed by them visiting their house to deliver these gifts, or exposed after a relative or similar visits a place where they get exposed - such as a synagogue.

Who is going to be irresponsible, and who's going to wind up paying the price for it?

This is also driven home by the words "יסע" (travel) and "ישא" (bear / suffer). These two words are pronounced the same way (as "yisa"), and using these specific words right after each other implies a connection: It's the traveling that's going to make people suffer the consequences. The song emphasizes that these two concepts - traveling and suffering - are directly linked in this scenario.

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