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What are the various literary allusions in Catch-22? While reading I recognized Shakespeare’s Shylock’s speech on “equality” (from Merchant of Venice) and a few lines on Abbott and Costello but was shocked to find out they were elements of Tom and Jerry, the Goons as well as Dostoyevsky and Kafkaesque writings (as mentioned here under literary allusions) Could anybody point out the chapters consisting of the above literary allusions & highlight them over here?

Clarification: This question is not about all literary allusions in Catch-22 but about the allusions to The Merchant of Venice, Abbott & Costello, Tom & Jerry, the Goons, Dostoyevsky and Kafka.

  • Doesn't asking about all literary allusions make this question very broad? Could you narrow down your question a bit? – Tsundoku Jun 3 at 9:39
  • @Tsundoku I edited my question. Does it help now? – Shreyas JV Jun 3 at 9:53
  • So are you asking specifically about the allusions Catch-22 makes to The Merchant of Venice, Abbott & Costello, Tom & Jerry, the Goons, Dostoyevsky and Kafka? Is that a correct interpretation of your question? – Tsundoku Jun 3 at 12:51
  • @Tsundoku yes, that would be it – Shreyas JV Jun 3 at 12:53

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