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I am having some trouble comprehending a portion of "Liberty Tree" by Thomas Paine, and was unable to find a decent analysis of it. It is my understanding that this poem is about the Liberty Tree that was located in Boston where the Sons of Liberty met in order to plan (it died in 1923, and is now memorialized by a statue).

Specifically this stanza:

In a chariot of light, from the regions of the day,
The Goddess of Liberty came,
Ten thousand celestials directed her way,
And hither conducted the dame.
A fair budding branch from the gardens above,
Where millions with millions agree,
She brought in her hand as a pledge of her love,
And the plant she named Liberty Tree.

Update:

Also, is this reference to timber about the pine which was supplied by the colonies to make masts for their ships?

Beneath this fair tree, like the patriarchs of old,
Their bread in contentment they ate,
Unvexed with the troubles of silver or gold,
The cares of the grand and the great.
With timber and tar they Old England supplied,
And supported her power on the sea;
Her battles they fought, without getting a groat,
For the honor of Liberty Tree.

Update 2:

My question was poorly worded, and I did not accurately communicate my points of confusion. I suppose what is really confusing me is specific lines within each stanza. Allow me to provide one example.

And hither conducted the dame.
A fair budding branch from the gardens above,
Where millions with millions agree,

What exactly does this mean? I can understand the overall meaning of the individual stanzas, but certain points confuse me. Even with my researching the definitions.

  • 1
    The first fragment describes the origin of the tree - brought by the Liberty from the heavens. Second simply says that people (in America) were giving all they could for Old England without getting anything back. – Yasskier Aug 1 at 21:07
  • My question was poorly worded, and I did not accurately communicate my points of confusion. I suppose what is really confusing me is specific lines within each stanza. Allow me to provide on example. "And hither conducted the dame. A fair budding branch from the gardens above, Where millions with millions agree," What exactly does this mean? I can understand the overall meaning of the individual stanzas, but certain points confuse me. Even with my researching the definitions. @Yasskier – temporary Aug 2 at 9:15
  • And towards this place they managed/directed themselves towards, this Lady Liberty and her Liberty Tree, from above the liberty tree, Americans, being represented as a " fair branch", all agreed... – Darth Locke Aug 2 at 15:54

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