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Unfortunately, I think it will be difficult to find it. JonhJohn Colapinto writes in his article for "The New Yorker":

The obvious solution would be to buy or borrow a copy of Roy's translation and compare it to Nabokov's, but that’s almost impossible to do. “Camera Obscura” sold only a handful of copies upon its release, and the London warehouse containing the unsold stock was destroyed by German bombs during the Second World War.

You can read the full article there.

Unfortunately, I think it will be difficult to find it. Jonh Colapinto writes in his article for "The New Yorker":

The obvious solution would be to buy or borrow a copy of Roy's translation and compare it to Nabokov's, but that’s almost impossible to do. “Camera Obscura” sold only a handful of copies upon its release, and the London warehouse containing the unsold stock was destroyed by German bombs during the Second World War.

You can read the full article there.

Unfortunately, I think it will be difficult to find it. John Colapinto writes in his article for "The New Yorker":

The obvious solution would be to buy or borrow a copy of Roy's translation and compare it to Nabokov's, but that’s almost impossible to do. “Camera Obscura” sold only a handful of copies upon its release, and the London warehouse containing the unsold stock was destroyed by German bombs during the Second World War.

You can read the full article there.

1
source | link

Unfortunately, I think it will be difficult to find it. Jonh Colapinto writes in his article for "The New Yorker":

The obvious solution would be to buy or borrow a copy of Roy's translation and compare it to Nabokov's, but that’s almost impossible to do. “Camera Obscura” sold only a handful of copies upon its release, and the London warehouse containing the unsold stock was destroyed by German bombs during the Second World War.

You can read the full article there.