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I notice that a lot of popular recent fiction, for example Robert Jordan's "Wheel of Time" , and George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" are written in limited/subjective third-person point of view (POV); both were written after 1990. In this style, only the part of the story that is known to the POV character is narrated, with the POV character usually changing from chapter to chapter or section to section. Even though the story is narrated from a character's POV, the writing is in the third person.

Whereas, if we compare to Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" (1950s), which is otherwise relatively similar in theme and structure, it was written in omniscient third person point of view, where the narration does not try to limit itself to what's known to a single character. I note similarities for Robert E. Howard's Conan books (1930s), when they have multiple main characters.

However, my view point is only limited, I've not conducted a formal study, and I have huge selection bias.

I would like to know ifHas there has indeed been a change in the relative frequency of "limited third-person point of view", vs "omniscient third person point of view"?

Perhaps, the limited third-person point of view a recent innovation, and unheard-of 100 years ago. Ideal evidence would be if this were backed up by a formal survey counting published books.

I notice that a lot of popular recent fiction, for example Robert Jordan's "Wheel of Time" , and George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" are written in limited/subjective third-person point of view (POV); both were written after 1990. In this style, only the part of the story that is known to the POV character is narrated, with the POV character usually changing from chapter to chapter or section to section. Even though the story is narrated from a character's POV, the writing is in the third person.

Whereas, if we compare to Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" (1950s), which is otherwise relatively similar in theme and structure, it was written in omniscient third person point of view, where the narration does not try to limit itself to what's known to a single character. I note similarities for Robert E. Howard's Conan books (1930s), when they have multiple main characters.

However, my view point is only limited, I've not conducted a formal study, and I have huge selection bias.

I would like to know if there has indeed been a change in the relative frequency of "limited third-person point of view", vs "omniscient third person point of view"

Perhaps, the limited third-person point of view a recent innovation, and unheard-of 100 years ago. Ideal evidence would be if this were backed up by a formal survey counting published books.

I notice that a lot of popular recent fiction, for example Robert Jordan's "Wheel of Time" , and George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" are written in limited/subjective third-person point of view (POV); both were written after 1990. In this style, only the part of the story that is known to the POV character is narrated, with the POV character usually changing from chapter to chapter or section to section. Even though the story is narrated from a character's POV, the writing is in the third person.

Whereas, if we compare to Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" (1950s), which is otherwise relatively similar in theme and structure, it was written in omniscient third person point of view, where the narration does not try to limit itself to what's known to a single character. I note similarities for Robert E. Howard's Conan books (1930s), when they have multiple main characters.

However, my view point is only limited, I've not conducted a formal study, and I have huge selection bias.

Has there been a change in the relative frequency of "limited third-person point of view", vs "omniscient third person point of view"?

Perhaps, the limited third-person point of view a recent innovation, and unheard-of 100 years ago. Ideal evidence would be if this were backed up by a formal survey counting published books.

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I notice that a lot of popular recent fiction, for example Robert Jordan's "Wheel of Time" , and George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" are written in limited/subjective third-person point of view (POV); both were written after 1990. In this style, only the part of the story that is known to the POV character is narrated, with the POV character usually changing from chapter to chapter or section to section. Even though the story is narrated from a character's POV, the writing is in the third person.

Whereas, if we compare to Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" (1950s), which is otherwise relatively similar in theme and structure, it was written in omniscient third person point of view, where the narration does not try to limit itself to what's known to a single character. I note similarities for Robert E. Howard's Conan books (1930s), when they have multiple main characters.

However, my view point is only limited, I've not conducted a formal study, and I have huge selection bias.

  • Has such a formal survey counting published books been conducted?
  • Is the limited third-person point of view a recent innovation?

I would like to know if there has indeed been a change in the relative frequency of "limited third-person point of view", vs "omniscient third person point of view"

Perhaps, the limited third-person point of view a recent innovation, and unheard-of 100 years ago. Ideal evidence would be if this were backed up by a formal survey counting published books.

I notice that a lot of popular recent fiction, for example Robert Jordan's "Wheel of Time" , and George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" are written in limited/subjective third-person point of view (POV); both were written after 1990. In this style, only the part of the story that is known to the POV character is narrated, with the POV character usually changing from chapter to chapter or section to section. Even though the story is narrated from a character's POV, the writing is in the third person.

Whereas, if we compare to Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" (1950s), which is otherwise relatively similar in theme and structure, it was written in omniscient third person point of view, where the narration does not try to limit itself to what's known to a single character. I note similarities for Robert E. Howard's Conan books (1930s), when they have multiple main characters.

However, my view point is only limited, I've not conducted a formal study, and I have huge selection bias.

  • Has such a formal survey counting published books been conducted?
  • Is the limited third-person point of view a recent innovation?

I notice that a lot of popular recent fiction, for example Robert Jordan's "Wheel of Time" , and George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" are written in limited/subjective third-person point of view (POV); both were written after 1990. In this style, only the part of the story that is known to the POV character is narrated, with the POV character usually changing from chapter to chapter or section to section. Even though the story is narrated from a character's POV, the writing is in the third person.

Whereas, if we compare to Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" (1950s), which is otherwise relatively similar in theme and structure, it was written in omniscient third person point of view, where the narration does not try to limit itself to what's known to a single character. I note similarities for Robert E. Howard's Conan books (1930s), when they have multiple main characters.

However, my view point is only limited, I've not conducted a formal study, and I have huge selection bias.

I would like to know if there has indeed been a change in the relative frequency of "limited third-person point of view", vs "omniscient third person point of view"

Perhaps, the limited third-person point of view a recent innovation, and unheard-of 100 years ago. Ideal evidence would be if this were backed up by a formal survey counting published books.

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Use of "limited third-person point of view", vs "omniscient third person point of view" over the past few centuriescentury or so

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    Notice added Draw attention by Lyndon White
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