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Although despiteDespite Lermontov's preface, I cannot help but feel that there is a degree of sincerity in calling pechorinPechorin a hero. The narrator even addresses this question at the end of the first part where the English translation is, 'Some readers will probably want to know what I think of Pechorin's character. My reply may be found in the title of this book. "But that is wicked irony!" they will say. I don't know.' this:

Some readers will probably want to know what I think of Pechorin's character. My reply may be found in the title of this book. "But that is wicked irony!" they will say. I don't know.

This quote shows it is not entirely ironic. There are very heroic characteristics in Pechorin - he is brave in the face of death, totally clear sighted and desperately magnetic. Everyone has so much evil in them but most deceive themselves and pretend that they are far more righteous than they actually are. Pechorin refuses to do this. He is aware of all his faults and does not try to justify them. The narration gives the reader such a vivid image of Pechorin's character that we cannot help but relate to him and therefore feel sympathy for him. He is not a good man nor a man that I would advise anyone to carry as a role model but his magnetism makes it impossible for him not to be considered as one of the greatest romantic heroes in literature. A truellytruly fantastic book, he is the best Russian prose writer in my opinion and his poetry is second only to Pushkin.

Although despite Lermontov's preface I cannot help but feel that there is a degree of sincerity in calling pechorin a hero. The narrator even addresses this question at the end of the first part where the English translation is, 'Some readers will probably want to know what I think of Pechorin's character. My reply may be found in the title of this book. "But that is wicked irony!" they will say. I don't know.' this quote shows it is not entirely ironic. There are very heroic characteristics in Pechorin - he is brave in the face of death, totally clear sighted and desperately magnetic. Everyone has so much evil in them but most deceive themselves and pretend that they are far more righteous than they actually are. Pechorin refuses to do this. He is aware of all his faults and does not try to justify them. The narration gives the reader such a vivid image of Pechorin's character that we cannot help but relate to him and therefore feel sympathy for him. He is not a good man nor a man that I would advise anyone to carry as a role model but his magnetism makes it impossible for him not to be considered as one of the greatest romantic heroes in literature. A truelly fantastic book, he is the best Russian prose writer in my opinion and his poetry is second only to Pushkin.

Despite Lermontov's preface, I cannot help but feel that there is a degree of sincerity in calling Pechorin a hero. The narrator even addresses this question at the end of the first part where the English translation is:

Some readers will probably want to know what I think of Pechorin's character. My reply may be found in the title of this book. "But that is wicked irony!" they will say. I don't know.

This quote shows it is not entirely ironic. There are very heroic characteristics in Pechorin - he is brave in the face of death, totally clear sighted and desperately magnetic. Everyone has so much evil in them but most deceive themselves and pretend that they are far more righteous than they actually are. Pechorin refuses to do this. He is aware of all his faults and does not try to justify them. The narration gives the reader such a vivid image of Pechorin's character that we cannot help but relate to him and therefore feel sympathy for him. He is not a good man nor a man that I would advise anyone to carry as a role model but his magnetism makes it impossible for him not to be considered as one of the greatest romantic heroes in literature. A truly fantastic book, he is the best Russian prose writer in my opinion and his poetry is second only to Pushkin.

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Although despite Lermontov's preface I cannot help but feel that there is a degree of sincerity in calling pechorin a hero. The narrator even addresses this question at the end of the first part where the English translation is, 'Some readers will probably want to know what I think of Pechorin's character. My reply may be found in the title of this book. "But that is wicked irony!" they will say. I don't know.' this quote shows it is not entirely ironic. There are very heroic characteristics in Pechorin - he is brave in the face of death, totally clear sighted and desperately magnetic. Everyone has so much evil in them but most deceive themselves and pretend that they are far more righteous than they actually are. Pechorin refuses to do this. He is aware of all his faults and does not try to justify them. The narration gives the reader such a vivid image of Pechorin's character that we cannot help but relate to him and therefore feel sympathy for him. He is not a good man nor a man that I would advise anyone to carry as a role model but his magnetism makes it impossible for him not to be considered as one of the greatest romantic heroes in literature. A truelly fantastic book, he is the best Russian prose writer in my opinion and his poetry is second only to Pushkin.