2 Added link to poem; changed "Stanzas" to "Sections", as each section has multiple stanzas and the OP means "sections".
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While reading Tennyson's In Memoriam A.H.H.In Memoriam A.H.H., written in honor of his close friend Arthur Henry Hallam, I noticed that Christmas is a recurring theme. In appears several times:

  • StanzasSections XXVIII - XXX, from "The time draws near the birth of Christ" to "The light that shone when hope was born".
  • StanzaSection LXXVIII, from "Again at Christmas did we weave" to "And dance and song and hoodman-blind".
  • StanzasSections CIV - CVI, from "The time draws near the birth of Christ" to "Ring in the Christ that is to be".

I then checked Wikipedia, which notes what I had already thought:

The passage of time is marked by the three descriptions of Christmas at different points in the poem

which makes sense, as In Memoriam was written over more than a decade. However, I think there might be more to it than that. For instance, stanza CVII transitions from celebrating Christmas ("the birth of Christ") to discussing the anniversary of Hallam's birth in February ("It is the day when he was born"). It's a little suggestive of a certain parallel - although, granted, it could simply be that Christmas reminded Tennyson of when he celebrated with his friend.

Is there a deeper significance to Tennyson's repeated description of Christmases past and present, beyond simply showing how the years go by without Hallam?

While reading Tennyson's In Memoriam A.H.H., written in honor of his close friend Arthur Henry Hallam, I noticed that Christmas is a recurring theme. In appears several times:

  • Stanzas XXVIII - XXX, from "The time draws near the birth of Christ" to "The light that shone when hope was born".
  • Stanza LXXVIII, from "Again at Christmas did we weave" to "And dance and song and hoodman-blind".
  • Stanzas CIV - CVI, from "The time draws near the birth of Christ" to "Ring in the Christ that is to be".

I then checked Wikipedia, which notes what I had already thought:

The passage of time is marked by the three descriptions of Christmas at different points in the poem

which makes sense, as In Memoriam was written over more than a decade. However, I think there might be more to it than that. For instance, stanza CVII transitions from celebrating Christmas ("the birth of Christ") to discussing the anniversary of Hallam's birth in February ("It is the day when he was born"). It's a little suggestive of a certain parallel - although, granted, it could simply be that Christmas reminded Tennyson of when he celebrated with his friend.

Is there a deeper significance to Tennyson's repeated description of Christmases past and present, beyond simply showing how the years go by without Hallam?

While reading Tennyson's In Memoriam A.H.H., written in honor of his close friend Arthur Henry Hallam, I noticed that Christmas is a recurring theme. In appears several times:

  • Sections XXVIII - XXX, from "The time draws near the birth of Christ" to "The light that shone when hope was born".
  • Section LXXVIII, from "Again at Christmas did we weave" to "And dance and song and hoodman-blind".
  • Sections CIV - CVI, from "The time draws near the birth of Christ" to "Ring in the Christ that is to be".

I then checked Wikipedia, which notes what I had already thought:

The passage of time is marked by the three descriptions of Christmas at different points in the poem

which makes sense, as In Memoriam was written over more than a decade. However, I think there might be more to it than that. For instance, stanza CVII transitions from celebrating Christmas ("the birth of Christ") to discussing the anniversary of Hallam's birth in February ("It is the day when he was born"). It's a little suggestive of a certain parallel - although, granted, it could simply be that Christmas reminded Tennyson of when he celebrated with his friend.

Is there a deeper significance to Tennyson's repeated description of Christmases past and present, beyond simply showing how the years go by without Hallam?

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What is the meaning of Christmas in In Memoriam A.H.H.?

While reading Tennyson's In Memoriam A.H.H., written in honor of his close friend Arthur Henry Hallam, I noticed that Christmas is a recurring theme. In appears several times:

  • Stanzas XXVIII - XXX, from "The time draws near the birth of Christ" to "The light that shone when hope was born".
  • Stanza LXXVIII, from "Again at Christmas did we weave" to "And dance and song and hoodman-blind".
  • Stanzas CIV - CVI, from "The time draws near the birth of Christ" to "Ring in the Christ that is to be".

I then checked Wikipedia, which notes what I had already thought:

The passage of time is marked by the three descriptions of Christmas at different points in the poem

which makes sense, as In Memoriam was written over more than a decade. However, I think there might be more to it than that. For instance, stanza CVII transitions from celebrating Christmas ("the birth of Christ") to discussing the anniversary of Hallam's birth in February ("It is the day when he was born"). It's a little suggestive of a certain parallel - although, granted, it could simply be that Christmas reminded Tennyson of when he celebrated with his friend.

Is there a deeper significance to Tennyson's repeated description of Christmases past and present, beyond simply showing how the years go by without Hallam?